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Archive for October, 2010

I say potato bread!  I’m not sure how you make “actual” potato bread as I never looked up a recipe, but this stuff tastes fricken spectacular.  The first batch I made was better as I think it had less flour and more salt, but the 2nd go round is still blog worthy.

A few weeks ago I tried to make this focaccia recipe I found somewhere that had olives and tomatoes all over the place.  As many things do, it turned out better in my head than in my oven.  But!  There was a comment left by somebody on that post talking about adding boiled potatoes to bread dough… I just so happened to have like 8 potatoes from my CSA share, so into the kitchen I went!

This bread is light and moist and the crust somehow manages to obtain an almost perfect level of crunchiness.  Gary and I went through the last loaf in about 3 days.  We’re hoping to keep this little guy around long enough for his mother and sister to try… (we’ll see how that goes).

So, without any further him hawing, here’s what you do.

Potato Bread, adapted from the Urban Spork

  • 2 medium potatoes (yukon, red, what have you)
  • 1 – 1.5 C water
  • 2 & 1/4 t yeast (or a packet)
  • about 2 C AP flour & 1 C wheat flour
  • about 1 T kosher salt

Dice up the potatoes, through them in a sauce pan and cover with water.  You can peel them if you like but that always seems unnecessary to me.  Boil the potatoes until they are soft (like you’re making mashers), about 10 – 15 minutes.  Once done, pour them into a blender and puree them until smooth.  I measured about a cup of water (used the remaining potato water actually) at this point and added it to the blender.

In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt and yeast.  Pour in the potato puree and mix with a spoon until the dough is evenly wet – you might need more water here.  You aren’t going to get a solid ball of dough; it’ll be sticky and look messy.  Cover with plastic wrap and lay a towel over it.  Let it rise about an hour or two and then stick it in the fridge for awhile or overnight.

When you’re ready to bake, pull it out of the fridge, cover your hands with flour and quickly make a loaf(ish) shape out of the dough and place it in a pan.  I used a round spring form cake pan.  If your dough’s a little too wet it won’t hold the shape so put it in a pan small enough to contain whatever shape you’re going for.  Throw some flour on top of the dough and cut a crisscross shape into it .  This might just be for looks, but I’m thinking there’s a higher purpose here.  Wait 20 minutes.

Now, preheat the oven to about 450 degrees.  I put a pan of water in the bottom of the oven as it’s supposed to help the texture of the bread (not sure if I’ve really been successful with this part or not).  Once another 20 minutes has expired, put the bread in the oven.  Mine’s usually done in 25 – 30 minutes.

Remove from oven and tuck in!

I’m going to try to make a gluten free version of this at some point, I just haven’t gotten there yet (sorry Rach).

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